Elevate: Golf

Elevate: Golf

Get a Grip

How to hold the club correctly to get the best shot possible

The first thing anyone needs to learn when they start playing golf is how to hold the golf club. Believe it or not, it’s not as simple as many people think. Even if you’ve been playing for a while, your grip might still be holding your game back. A good grip isn’t necessarily the one that feels natural. In fact, most people feel that a good grip is the most unnatural thing imaginable at first. The good news, though, is that the grip is simple.

What you always want to remember is to keep your hands relatively loose. When things get uncomfortable or unfamiliar, our tendency is to tense up. This isn’t a good thing for your grip, so resist the urge to hold the club tighter. A good image to keep in your mind is to imagine the club’s grip as a tube of toothpaste with the cap off and the opening pointing down. If you were to swing the tube, no toothpaste would come out. That’s about how hard you want to grip the club.

Imagine the club’s grip as a tube of toothpaste with the cap off and the opening pointing down. If you were to swing the tube, no toothpaste would come out. That’s about how hard you want to grip the club.

Next, start with your lead hand (the left hand for a right-handed golfer and vice versa). Open up your hand and lay the grip of the club diagonally across your fingers. It should start at the base of your pinkie and go to the tip of your pointer finger. Then, wrap the rest of your hand around the club, keeping the club in the fingers of your hand. If you were to lift the club with one hand, you could swing it like a hammer at this point. If you feel like you don’t have control over the movement, it probably means the club is too far in your palm.

Before you put the other hand on the club, make sure that the base of your pointer finger and thumb are together without much separation. Extend your thumb as long as you comfortably can and rest it on the trail side of the club (the right side for a right-handed player). Your pointer finger and thumb should form a “V” or a crease. Imagine that’s an arrow that’s pointing at your trail shoulder (the right shoulder for a right-handed player).

Now you’re ready to put your other hand on the club. Touch the tip of your pinkie and thumb together on your second hand. That should form a pit in your palm. Imagine that is a hot dog bun and the thumb on your first hand is the hot dog. Put the hot dog in the bun as you put the second hand on the club. Again, your thumb and pointer finger should form a “V” that also points toward your trail shoulder.

Similar to your first hand, the thumb of your second hand should extend toward the opposite side of the club (the left side for a right-handed player).

Finally, on the underside of your grip, you have a couple of options: You can either overlap the pinkie of your second hand over the pointer finger of the first, interlock those two like a chain or overlap/interlock zero fingers. All methods are correct, but the important thing is that you only do one finger or fewer.

There you have it: the perfect golf grip. This will help set up the rest of your shot for success. You can even adjust it a bit to straighten out your shot. If you leave the club face open too much at impact, rotate both hands toward your trail side. If the opposite is true and you close the face at impact too much, then rotate both hands toward the target a bit.


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